Best Benjamin Graham Quotes

Best Benjamin Graham Quotes

Benjamin Graham quotes showcase his views on the financial system, and how the stock market works. Graham quotes are considered of great value and he was called “father of value investing”. He lived in the same era as investors like Andrew Carnegie and J. P. Morgan who all lived during “The Great Depression”.

Benjamin Graham Wiki

Benjamin Graham was an American investor who was born in England. Warren Buffett spoke about the book, that Graham had written called “The Intelligent Investor”. He said that it was the best book he ever read on investing. Below are a number of his quotes.

Best Benjamin Graham Quotes

“The intelligent investor is a realist who sells to optimists and buys from pessimists.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“In the short run, the market is a voting machine but in the long run, it is a weighing machine.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“An investment operation is one which, upon thorough analysis, promises safety of principal and an adequate return. Operations not meeting these requirements are speculative.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“But investing isn’t about beating others at their game. It’s about controlling yourself at your own game.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“The stock investor is neither right or wrong because others agreed or disagreed with him; he is right because his facts and analysis are right.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“As the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard noted, life can only be understood backwards—but it must be lived forwards.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“People who invest make money for themselves; people who speculate make money for their brokers.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“The punches you miss are the ones that wear you out. —Boxing trainer Angelo Dundee.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“And back in the spring of 1720, Sir Isaac Newton owned shares in the South Sea Company, the hottest stock in England. Sensing that the market was getting out of hand, the great physicist muttered that he “could calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of the people.” Newton dumped his South Sea shares, pocketing a 100% profit totaling £7,000. But just months later, swept up in the wild enthusiasm of the market, Newton jumped back in at a much higher price—and lost £20,000 (or more than $3 million in today’s money). For the rest of his life, he forbade anyone to speak the words “South Sea” in his presence.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“A cynic once told G. K. Chesterton, the British novelist and essayist, “Blessed is he who expecteth nothing, for he shall not be disappointed.” Chesterton’s rejoinder? “Blessed is he who expecteth nothing, for he shall enjoy everything.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“Americans are getting stronger. Twenty years ago, it took two people to carry ten dollars’ worth of groceries. Today, a five-year-old can do it. —Henny Youngman”
by Benjamin Graham

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“Buy cheap and sell dear.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“Invest only if you would be comfortable owning a stock even if you had no way of knowing its daily share price.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“On the other hand, investing is a unique kind of casino—one where you cannot lose in the end, so long as you play only by the rules that put the odds squarely in your favor.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“you must thoroughly analyze a company, and the soundness of its underlying businesses, before you buy its stock; you must deliberately protect yourself against serious losses; you must aspire to “adequate,” not extraordinary, performance.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“A stock is not just a ticker symbol or an electronic blip; it is an ownership interest in an actual business, with an underlying value that does not depend on its share price.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“The most realistic distinction between the investor and the speculator is found in their attitude toward stock-market movements. The speculator’s primary interest lies in anticipating and profiting from market fluctuations. The investor’s primary interest lies in acquiring and holding suitable securities at suitable prices. Market movements are important to him in a practical sense, because they alternately create low price levels at which he would be wise to buy and high price levels at which he certainly should refrain from buying and probably would be wise to sell.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“It is far from certain that the typical investor should regularly hold off buying until low market levels appear, because this may involve a long wait, very likely the loss of income, and the possible missing of investment opportunities. On the whole it may be better for the investor to do his stock buying whenever he has money to put in stocks, except when the general market level is much higher than can be justified by well-established standards of value. If he wants to be shrewd he can look for the ever-present bargain opportunities in individual securities. Aside from forecasting the movements of the general market, much effort and ability are directed on Wall Street toward selecting stocks or industrial groups that in matter of price will “do better” than the rest over a fairly short period in the future.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“Logical as this endeavor may seem, we do not believe it is suited to the needs or temperament of the true investor—particularly since he would be competing with a large number of stock-market traders and first-class financial analysts who are trying to do the same thing. As in all other activities that emphasize price movements first and underlying values second, the work of many intelligent minds constantly engaged in this field tends to be self-neutralizing and self-defeating over the years. The investor with a portfolio of sound stocks should expect their prices to fluctuate and should neither be concerned by sizable declines nor become excited by sizable advances. He should always remember that market quotations are there for his convenience, either to be taken advantage of or to be ignored. He should never buy a stock because it has gone up or sell one because it has gone down. He would not be far wrong if this motto read more simply: “Never buy a stock immediately after a substantial rise or sell one immediately after a substantial drop.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“If the reason people invest is to make money, then in seeking advice they are asking others to tell them how to make money. That idea has some element of naïveté.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“In other words, the market is not a weighing machine, on which the value of each issue is recorded by an exact and impersonal mechanism, in accordance with its specific qualities. Rather should we say that the market is a voting machine, whereon countless individuals register choices which are the product partly of reason and partly of emotion.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“The psychologists Daniel Kahnerman and Amos Tversky have shown when humans estimate the likelihood or frequency of an event, we make that judgment based not on how often the event has actually occurred, but on how vivid the past examples are.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“You will be much more in control, if you realize how much you are not in control.”
by Benjamin Graham

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“The investment world nevertheless has enough liars, cheaters, and thieves to keep Satan's check-in clerks frantically busy for decades to come.”
by Benjamin Graham

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