Best Peter Lynch Quotes

Best Peter Lynch Quotes

Peter Lynch quotes share extensive knowledge on stock trading, when to buy, what to buy and a number of other ideas. He has made millions of dollars through various investments. He shares a wealth of information just like Warren Buffet and Carlos Slim who are both investors.

Peter Lynch Wiki

Peter Lynch is an American philanthropist, investor, and mutual fund manager who is a multi-millionaire. Jeff Bezos mentioned him in a book that talks about investing in companies and ignoring the short time frame outlook. Lynch has a wealth of knowledge as an investor that many who are richer than he is, appreciate. Below are a number of his quotes.

Best Peter Lynch Quotes

“The trick is not to learn to trust your gut feelings, but rather to discipline yourself to ignore them. Stand by your stocks as long as the fundamental story of the company hasn’t changed.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“Whenever you invest in any company, you’re looking for its market cap to rise. This can’t happen unless buyers are paying higher prices for the shares, making your investment more valuable.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“People who succeed in the stock market also accept periodic losses, setbacks, and unexpected occurrences. Calamitous drops do not scare them out of the game.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“Know what you own, and know why you own it.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“Big companies have small moves, small companies have big moves.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“Moderately fast growers (20 to 25 percent) in nongrowth industries are ideal investments. • Look for companies with niches. • When purchasing depressed stocks in troubled companies, seek out the ones with the superior financial positions and avoid the ones with loads of bank debt. • Companies that have no debt can’t go bankrupt. • Managerial ability may be important, but it’s quite difficult to assess. Base your purchases on the company’s prospects, not on the president’s resume or speaking ability. • A lot of money can be made when a troubled company turns around. • Carefully consider the price-earnings ratio. If the stock is grossly overpriced, even if everything else goes right, you won’t make any money. • Find a story line to follow as a way of monitoring a company’s progress. • Look for companies that consistently buy back their own shares.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“Peter Lynch doesn’t advise you to buy stock in your favorite store just because you like shopping in the store, nor should you buy stock in a manufacturer because it makes your favorite product or a restaurant because you like the food. Liking a store, a product, or a restaurant is a good reason to get interested in a company and put it on your research list, but it’s not enough of a reason to own the stock! Never invest in any company before you’ve done the homework on the company’s earnings prospects, financial condition, competitive position, plans for expansion, and so forth.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“Remember, things are never clear until it’s too late.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“When you sell in desperation, you always sell cheap.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“The old Wall Street adage "never invest in anything that eats or needs repairs" may apply to racehorses, but it's malarkey when it comes to houses.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“It takes remarkable patience to hold on to a stock in a company that excites you, but which everybody else seems to ignore. You begin to think everybody else is right and you are wrong. But where the fundamentals are promising, patience is often rewarded—Lukens stock went up sixfold in the fifteenth year, American Greetings was a sixbagger in six years, Angelica a sevenbagger in four, Brunswick a sixbagger in five, and SmithKline a threebagger in two.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“If you can follow only one bit of data, follow the earnings—assuming the company in question has earnings. As you’ll see in this text, I subscribe to the crusty notion that sooner or later earnings make or break an investment in equities. What the stock price does today, tomorrow, or next week is only a distraction.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“Here are some pointers from this section: • Understand the nature of the companies you own and the specific reasons for holding the stock. (“It is really going up!” doesn’t count.) • By putting your stocks into categories you’ll have a better idea of what to expect from them.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“Go for a business that any idiot can run – because sooner or later any idiot probably is going to be running it.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“The typical big winner in the Lynch portfolio (I continue to pick my share of losers, too!) generally takes three to ten years or more to play out.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“The more cash that builds up in the treasury, the greater the pressure to piss it away.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“Actually Wall Street thinks just as the Greeks did. The early Greeks used to sit around for days and debate how many teeth a horse has. They thought they could figure it out by just sitting there, instead of checking the horse.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“The secret of his success is that he never went to business school. Imagina all the lessons he never had to unlearn.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“Understand the nature of the companies you own and the specific reasons for holding the stock. (“It is really going up!” doesn’t count.)
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“A person who owns property and has a stake in the enterprise is likely to work harder and feel happier and do a better job than a person who doesn't.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“stick with a steady and consistent performer”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“Primes are the atoms of the number system: every whole number is a product of primes.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“This is one of the keys to successful investing: focus on the companies, not on the stocks.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

“Invest in What You Know.”
by Peter Lynch

Share on Social Media

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *